Savings to flow from TDHS investments in power and water
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TDHS Support Services Manager Graeme McDonald with the new Water Softening System Web

Savings to flow from TDHS investments in power and water

Major savings are forecast for years to come following two significant investments in power and water quality technologies at Timboon and District Healthcare Service (TDHS).

Final commissioning of the organisation’s 70kW solar array power system is expected within days following the installation of 268 panels in recent weeks.

A new state-of-the-art water softening system has also been switched on, complete with UV filtering. It will remove the hardness of the local reticulated water supply to prolong the life of TDHS’s equipment.

Acting chief executive officer Rebecca Van Wollingen said both projects were positive investments in the long-term economic future of TDHS.

“As an organisation we’re proud that our solar system will reduce our carbon footprint, but the economic savings are also a huge benefit to the organisation,” she said.

“Analysis of our power usage suggests a first year saving of $26,700 and an estimated payback period under three years.

“When you consider the expected life of the system is 25 years, this project will pay for itself many times over by greatly reducing our power bills – which are one of our biggest costs.”

TDHS Solar Panels Web

Ms Van Wollingen said local contractors had been used where possible – both for the solar project and water softening system.

“There are a number of benefits of the water softening system upgrade, including the capacity to pump more water and make sure we always have good pressure,” she said.

“The reticulated water here is within acceptable parameters, but it’s quite hard from the local aquifers and that can be damaging to our equipment and reduce its life.

“Now with two state-of-the-art water pumps and water softening canasters we can maintain and flush the system without an interruption as well.”

Ms Wollingen said patients, clients and staff had also commented about the enhanced drinkability of the water with the additional impurities removed.

  • Pictured above is TDHS Support Services Manager Graeme McDonald with the new Water Softening System.
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